Note: These are not related to me, but thought people looking for families with these names might be interested.  The stained glass windows in the 1928 Gothic sanctuary of Wesley UMC in Oklahoma City has many windows donated in memory or to honor a family.

In this area, there are various donations and gifts such as plaques, furnishings, and decorations. Above the narthex area (which faces the eastern entrance of the church) is this window -
East Window
“Jesus Blessing the Little Children” (1928)- Mrs. Florida Knight.

Cloister, North
(West) “The Nativity” – Mrs. William E. Rowland
(Center) “The Boy Christ”- Mr. & Mrs. J. Edgar Strader
(East) “Christ at the Door”- Mrs. Clara Bell & Family

North Transept
“The Transfiguration” (1928)-Mr. & Mrs. Hillard John Scott
(West) “The Last Supper” –Mr. & Mrs. L.R. Springer
(Center) “Jesus and His Mother”- Ladies’ Bible Class
(East) “The First Disciple”

Chancel  (West or Choir)
“The Beckoning Christ” (Come Unto Me) (1928) - Mr. Overstreet, father of Mrs. Campbell Russell

South Transept
“The Good Shepherd” (1928)- Mrs. Jessie B. Fleming and Mrs. Virginia C. Shike
“Rich Young Man”- T.Harold and Captain W.E. Corkhill
“Gethsemane”- Mrs. D.G. Murray & Family
“Best Friend” – Mrs. Laura S. Day and Miss Olga Stokesberry
“Empty Tomb”- Mr. & Mrs. O.H. Putney

Cloister, South (or Ambulatory)
(East) “Holy Women of the Tomb”- Mrs. N.A. Whittaker and Family
(Center) “World Encircled” – WCTU (Women’s Christian Temperance Union)
(West) “The Ascension”- Mr. and Mrs. Charles Johnson and Miss Minnie Suitor

Triangular Plot (East) – Fronting east entry area between Douglas and Classen Blvd. Land donated by noted early Oklahoma City founding leader, Anton Classen (before 1928).  Mrs. Classen later donated landscaping and other improvements.
Large Window on the South Transept, "Jesus, The Good Shepherd"
Donated by Mrs. Jesse B. Fleming and Mrs. Virginia C. Shike - to honor husband and father, George Fleming.
He made the 1889 land run and opened the first drug store in Oklahoma City.


Terry Wills - Virginia

unidentified source:

Terry, Jasper - This will was probated July 6 1819. Names wife as Margaret and children as : Kezia Graham, Jemima Drweasem Karon Happuck, Rose, William, Jonathan, Elijah, and a step-daughter Sussanah Snidow.  Montgomery Co., Va.

Terry, William - Will probated Feb 1826. Names wife Patience, and nieces Elizabeth, Patience Cooper, daughters of Washington Cooper.

New DNA studies are establishing relationships - and disconnecting previously accepted relationships -
see Terry's at World Families.



A male descendent of the William Terry, Botetourt Co., Va. group has been identified as having DNA fitting into the I2a2 grouping.

This Terry line is -

  • William Terry  md. Rachel Manson
  • John Terry md Esther Brown
  • William Terry md Barbara Ennis
  • Martin Terry md Mary Ann Reed
  • John King Terry md Mary Ann Riddle
  • Wesley Sartin Terry md. Edna Maggie Boyd
  • Roy Dennis Terry md. #1 -                        #2 - Velma Cochren
A male descendent of Velma Cochren has been identified as having DNA fitting into Haplogroup U5a1a1.



The Carter Girls

Nettie, Annie, Nellie Carter daughters of Mary Louisa Ray and Charles Henry Carter.

Annie Catherine Carter King

 From the family of Mary Louisa Ray and Charles Henry Carter:  
Annie was born 30 Jan 1902 in Scott Co., Missouri and died  20 Oct 1996 in Herrin, Williamson, Illinois.  She married Homer King  in 1921 in Scott Co., Missouri. 
Her children:  

Kathryn King 1923 –
Mildred Fay King 1927 – 2011
Virginia King 1930 –
Nadine King

Nettie Odela Carter Adkins

Another child of Mary Louisa Ray and Charles Henry Carter -
Nettie Odela Carter was born Jan. 18, 1900 in Wayne Co., Mo, probably around Black Creek or Lost Creek.  She is listed on the 1900 in Johnson Township, Carter, Missouri
In 1910 she is in Williams, Wayne, Missouri .   In 1920, she is  20 and on the Richland, Scott, Missouri census and by 1930 she is married the Thomas L. Adkins and is buried in Deepwater, Bates, Missouri .   She died  in Nov 1934 in Bates County and is buried in Radford Cemetery.

Nellie Carter King

Nellie Carter was born about 1905 in Wayne Co., Missouri to Mary Louisa RAY and her husband Charles Henry CARTER.   She is listed on the  1910 census for Wayne and on the Scott Co., Mo census for 1920.  She married Jesse King. Nothing more is known. 

A Mystery No More : Ray-Carter Line

When this photo was first discovered no one had any clues who these people were.  The first of two clues was that it belonged to Effie Algerty Ray Conner Hudson and the second clue that on a second image of just the same three women the names "Annie, Nellie, and Nettie" were penciled on the back.

Finally, the mystery has been solved, although many still remain.

Effie had a sister Mary Louisa Ray who married Charles Henry Carter. They settled in Scott Co., Mo.  They had daughters Nellie, Nettie, Annie, and Julie C. Carter.    Left to right the women above are: Annie Catherine Carter King (wife of Homer), Nellie Carter, and Nettie Carter King (wife of Jesse).  The children are thought to be Annie's daughters.   

Effie and Mary Louisa were the daughters of Drury Edward Ray and Harriet Anna Rowe Ray. The other siblings were:  Lucy Elizabeth Ray Hurst Lord, Julius Harriet Ray and Wilson Edward Ray,


Minature Leather Work - Curtis Hudson

Curtis R. Hudson when he was about 13-15 years old crafted some minatures including a saddle, holster, and chaps. During that time period he was living in Seibert, Colorado. See more here.

Buckeye, Arizona Rodeo Parade ca 1963

Shown left to right Marvin J. Hudson, Curtis R.Hudson and Roy C. Hudson in Buckeye, Arizona.


Thomas Benjamin Cain

Donated - unknown source
Thistewood (Now Beechwood) Cemetery
Pulaski Co., Il

Hudson-Cain Line

The 'dead end'  of the Hudson line is the family of a William Hudson who married an Emily Jane Cain in 1868 Evansville, Vanderburg, Indiana.   On the 1880 Census they are in Mound City, Pulaski, Il census and the family consists of William, Emily, Lewis Hudson, Millie Hudson and stepson, Benjamin Kane.  Working backward from that information I began to search for where this child was in 1870, the first census after the marriage.  I found who I believe to be William Hudson, his wife using the name "Emma" and a child named Lewis living in Evansville.  No "Benjamin".  Then I found two children, Benjamin and William Cain enumerated with a Thomas B. Carter and an older woman named Millie Parker.  Further backtracking found that Thomas B. Carter was the half-brother of Emily and the woman most certainly their mother who had been Millie Greer, married a Cullen W. Carter and then a Lewis Cain. Parker is thought to be a third husband.  The family is found in 1850 showing children of both Carter and Cain last names. Lewis Hudson is listed as next of kin when Thomas Benjamin Carter dies at the Veterans hospital in Leavenworth, Kansas in 1919.

Other records indicate that Benjamin Cain was Thomas Benjamin Cain and he remained in southern Illinois.  It is believed he married Rosy Anna Brown.  His grave is thought to be in the Thistlewood Cemetery (now Beechwood) in Pulaski Co., Illinois.  The graves are not listed in Find-a-Grave and other listings but the area is well known for not having complete records assessible for online research.  No record of his step-father or his mother's grave have been found either.

It is assumed that Emily was his mother but no marriage records have been located connecting her to a marriage before William Hudson.  Further, there is the fact the child has her maiden name.  What this might mean is an illegitimate birth or the child belonged to someone else.  The name may provide some clues to the father.

Emily had at least two full brothers, Henry and Alexander, who are hard to locate after the Civil War.  It is possible these might be parent of the child and with a death the child might have been taken in by family members.  That he was named after an uncle may indicate a figure who was respected by the younger brothers.

It is obvious that Emily named her Hudson children after her father Lewis and her mother Millie.  On the death certificate of Lewis Hudson he noted his mother's name as Emma Carter which might indicate a confused awareness of his mother's family tree, since he had known his uncle Thomas B. Carter and records indicate she used on one census the name "Emma."

Thomas B. Carter, to further confuse things purchased a cemetery plot in Mechanicsville, Vanderburgh Co., Ind in 1876.  He also purchased a plot in the Cairo City Cemetery in southern Ill in the  mid 1880's.  They were apparently never used  - at least no evidence has been found to date. Plots for wives? Plots for sister and her husband? Plot for his own eventual demise? Plot for his mother or a wife?


Where Are They? Dead, buried, and invisible

One of the most frustrating aspects of tracking family history is when people who should be buried in a cemetery do not appear on any index, list, etc.   Numerous death certificates will say where the burial was to take place but they frequently cannot be found with any ease.  Reasons might be a last minute choice for the burial site, poor maintenance of local cemeteries leading to destruction or loss of markers (not all people had formal and expensive stone markers), local flood or development that might destroy portions of a burial ground.   The value of local volunteers doing indexes of headstones, grave records, and obituaries is incalculable. 

To researchers who must depend on the work of others because they cannot make those cemetery visits or conduct their own index work, the online records, lists and resources are a boon.   Too often they merely repeat the mistakes or limitations of previous works.

One area that has greatly frustrated research for one line is the area of Pulaski Co., Il and nearby Alexander Co., Il.   Several lines had probable and known deaths in the area.  Death certificates indicate burial location.  Most of the time, however, there is no index, no list, or what is found is obviously far short of the total burials recorded for the site.  

Local history researchers and community volunteers can combine to address these issues.  Local scouts, church, youth, business, school and paranormal groups are often willing to give back to their communities and preserve cemeteries and other historic records or sites.  

Long live random acts of genealogy kindness!



Pine Dresser Box - Annie Brown Cochren Willard

Passed in the family, it is not clear which husband gave her this box.  Family legend was that George D. Cochren gave it to her shortly after they married in 1912 in Kansas.  Dating the style of the box by McGraw Box Company, McGraw, NY will help to determine which is the most likely. Most styles found online appear to be square shaped boxes rather than this style. It appears to have metal (art nouveau?) trim, a tiny brass lock, satin lining, a mirror, and dovetail construction. The manufacturers name and address are incised on the bottom. It has some interesting slots inside that I know must have served some purpose (hair combs, hat pins?).  
Annie Brown Willaard with 3rd husband, Daniel Verne Willard
Annie Brown with 2nd husband, George Daniel Cochren

On bottom: McGraw Box Company, MNFG, McGraw, NY

Boeing Pins - Roy Dennis Terry

Roy Dennis Terry worked for Boeing Aircraft, Wichita, Kansas for about 30 years.  While there he was a member of a union as well. He wore the pin on the pencils/pens he used at work from the 1960's until he retired in about 1974.

Shadow Box

Part country decor and part historical artifacts, this shadow box was created in the 1980's.  It contains items of family  history interest:

Shelf 1 (top): a ceramic thimble, a milk bottle lid, a shell pin and a knife owned by Roy Terry, a watch owned by Roy Terry

Shelf 2: FFA award keychain, Marvin J. Hudson  empty,  religious track (ca 1910) w skeleton key, bride and groom from wedding cake of Marvin J. Hudson and Marilyn Terry Hudson.

Shelf 3:  reproduction miniature can with rock eff, pins from Boeing belonging to Roy D. Terry

Shelf 4: Old photo of unknown elderly couple, vintage sticker with minature rabbit, old pocket watch belonging to Marvin Hudson, a minature bottle of Chanel No. 5 (empty).

Shelf 5:  Minature gum packages, craft nest with bird and eggs, original wooden thread spools, minature reproduction can

Shelf  6  (bottom): a craft rose, a minature tin of Anacin, a brial garter (Marilyn A. Hudson), a knife belonging to Roy Terry


Marker added for scale

Here are some images of minature leather work by Curtis Ray Hudson when he was about 13-15  years old.  He was living in Seibert, Colorado and Borger, Texas in this time.  He would later have a saddle and boot shop on two occasions and created many beautiful saddles while living in Arizona.


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